Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Fuchsia magellanica arauco

Fuchsia magellanica arauco
A very choice naturally occurring form of the popular hardy species with finely crafted flowers on a delicate small leaved shrub. The flowers are typical slender violet and red magellanica, but the sepals are white giving a very classy effect – not even slightly garish.
Fuchsia magellanica arauco
Like most magellanicas this is hardy and adaptable but seems less heat and drought tolerant than most Fuchsias.
£10




Fuchsia magellanica Lady Bacon, left, and arauco
Fuchsia magellanica arauco right, and Lady Bacon. The latter is very similar but paler in foliage and slightly larger in all its parts. I should have some later in the year

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Aristolochia fimbriata

Aristolochia are an on-going fascination of mine. I originally thought I might have a nice little collection of maybe 10 or 20 small hardy species for the National Collections scheme - a nice manageable group - how many could there be?
It turns out that 'a lot more than 20' is the answer, from southern Europe, North America, eastern Asia and even South America. As it stands I generally have only a few at a time for sale but the number is increasing and I'm not short of customers for them.
Aristolochia fimbriata
The peculiar yellow and brown tentacled flowers of this species are rather striking, and the silver veined leaves are good too.
Aristolochia fimbriata
This herbaceous species is possibly the hardiest of the South Americans currently in cultivation and worth a try in a sunny sheltered place, kept dryish in winter.
£8



Sunday, 2 July 2017

Salvia disjuncta

Salvia disjuncta
This is a very distinct almost shrubby sage from southern Mexico with impossibly vivid scarlet flowers among rounded fresh green leaves. In a group with, one might say, almost too many ornamental plants, it really stands out.
Salvia disjuncta
I have received mixed messages regarding it hardiness. The top growth is destroyed by frost but the roots move about quite freely and given a good mulch it might well regenerate. At any rate it's easy from cuttings and is a good pot plant as long as it doesn't freeze through. For well-drained soil in sun.
£8



Soldanella villosa

Soldanella villosa
Probably the easiest Soldanella for the open garden, spreading happily in well-drained but moist semi shade. The nodding flowers are not as elegant as the true alpine species but are a good violet and nicely fringed.
Soldanella villosa & Andromeda macrophylla
Like many Primulas, it performs better with regular division and replanting in fresh soil
£5



Apios americana

Apios americana
An unusual herbaceous climber closely related to Wisteria. The dense clusters of pea flowers are an odd shade of terracotta and produced in summer.
Apios americana
It grows from long strings of (apparently edible) tubers which wander about underground over some distance but not enough to become a weed.
An easy and attractive hardy plant for any well drained soil in sun, best allowed to twine up through shrubs
£8