Sunday, 29 July 2012

Euonymus

A real favourite genus of mine. For those who only know the rather characterless hedges of E.japonica and fortunei there are so many very different and much more interesting species to look out for, especially for their autumn colour, but the new growth, flowers and overall habit are worth checking out too.
Euonymus are especially good for chalky gardens.

Euonymus nanus turkestanicus
Euonymus nanus turkestanicus
A creeping evergreen species, quite different to the others with small narrow dark green leaves along wide-spreading stems. The leaves turn rich red brown shades in winter.
Codonopsis rotundifolia angustifolia
The flowers, though small, are plentiful and well worth looking out for. Small red spindle berries may follow.
Euonymus nanus turkestanicus
Excellent in dry shade but very adaptable.
3L pots ~ £9




Euonymus cornutus quinquecornutus 
Euonymus cornutus quinquecornutus
in flower
Euonymus cornutus and Polygonatum fruits
in fruit


What a mouthful. An Asiatic relative of our native spindle tree. The names mean 'horned' and 'five-horned' respectively, referring to the fruit which is typical Euonymus, having colourful seeds (orange in this case) emerging from a decorative casing, but in this species the casing has five long appendages (the horns) like a green propellor.
Although greenish brown, the flowers are also very pretty, carried on thread-like stems and worth looking out for in early summer. Semi-evergreen, this is a nice small willowy shrub for shade. Young plants – slow-growing.
3L pots ~ £9




Euonymus spraguei
Euonymus spraguei
Similar to E.fortunei - this is a spreading evergreen suitable for dry shade. It has green spiky fruits that split to reveal orange fruits
1L pots ~ £7




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